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BLACK GIRLS CODE and EVENT

We are all aware of these spoken, and unspoken, “codes” to live by. There are “Girl Codes”, “Guys Codes” … all of which generally follow the same overall guidelines. Guys: If you see your pal with “the other woman”, you…

We are all aware of these spoken, and unspoken, “codes” to live by. There are “Girl Codes”, “Guys Codes” … all of which generally follow the same overall guidelines. Guys: If you see your pal with “the other woman”, you keep your mouth shut. Girls: If you see your bestie’s guy with “the other woman” you better not even consider being silent.

Logically, there are exceptions to every rule and not every male and female think and act the same way. Understandable. These are very broad categories. So, when we discuss “codes” among races, are standards more clear? Or are lines even further blurred? To make any generalization of Black Girls, for example, would require at least some stereotypical assumptions. Let’s see: “Do not get a black girl’s hair wet”- Code or No? Some may accept it as their “code”, yet it’s a generalization that isn’t fair to impose on all Black females.

While these codes among people haphazardly focus on opinions and attitudes, a non-profit organization is focused on developing a worthier norm. Black Girls CODE is redefining the standards of Black Women in technology. According to Newsweek, “Black Americans make up just 7 percent of the country’s technology engineers. Just 3 percent are black women (theverge.com). These race and gender gaps can’t be explained by lack of access; the days when you had to be wealthy to use a computer as a kid have vanished”.

Black Girls CODE is devoted to showing the world that black girls can code and do so much more and that early access and exposure are essential to changing the status quo. Through a combination of workshops and field trips, Black Girls Code provides girls of color, ages 7 to 17, with new skills in computer programming, introducing them to role models in the technology space, and building their confidence to become tech creators and entrepreneurs.

By reaching out to the community through workshops and after school programs, Black Girls CODE introduces computer coding lessons to young girls from underrepresented communities in programming languages such as Scratch or Ruby on Rails. Black Girls CODE has set out to prove to the world that girls of every color have the skills to become the programmers of tomorrow. By promoting classes and programs, they hope to grow the number of women of color working in technology and give underprivileged girls a chance to become the masters of their technological worlds.

This April, nearly 100 young women took part in one of Black Girls CODE’s workshop at Google’s Headquarters. Most of the event’s volunteers work in tech and are acutely aware of the industry’s massive diversity problem. “Tech is mostly white and Asian,” says Robert Hui, a programmer with Netflix who volunteered his day to teach the girls to code. “That’s been the demographic since college” (Newsweek).

As NY1’s Natalie Duddridge reports, these young Girls are laser focused, they’re learning how to build games using computer programming. “You had the workshop inspires young black women to reboot the tech world, by increasing diversity in the digital space. “While some kids grow up wanting to be movie stars or famous celebrities, after learning to code here, these girls say they’d rather be tech stars”.

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